A new remote job offer turned out to be a hoax for a Kansas City, Kansas woman

A recent college graduate has a warning to others after she thought she got a new job. She was cheated instead, Miranda Owens said when she interviewed for a job at the end of last month. Now, she owes about $5,000 to her bank because the check she deposited from a potential employer turned out to be fake I’m not going to lie, it’s really hard,” she said. I’m really counting on this new job.” Owens moved from France to pursue his education at Coty College in Nevada, Missouri. She graduated in 2020 with a degree in psychology. Since she doesn’t own a car, she starts applying for remote jobs, but eventually falls into the process Scam offered her a remote job with a scammer pretending to be a reputable company.She said, “I looked at the Better Business Bureau. It’s legit.” “I looked for people on LinkedIn, in fact, they’re actually legit on LinkedIn.” Once Owens thought she got the job, her fake potential employer sent her a check to deposit in her bank to buy office supplies. He told her that She sends money via Zelle to buy office supplies from a supplier that she later finds are fake.This transaction was blocked, Owens said, so the scammer pretending to be her employer ordered her to send $4,500 in bitcoin from a Kansas City, KS, store Young for an office supply company that turned out to be a scam.Owens told KMBC 9 Investigates that she absolutely believed she had a safe and secure job offer. But she wanted to share her story as a warning as she worked to recover money that was now lost. She said, “We are the generation that should have been able to handle this better. However, here I am.” “I really want people like me to be careful.” Owens has also started GoFundMe to help recover money to pay off her debts. The Federal Trade Commission said a legitimate employer would not send you a check and then ask you to send that money in Elsewhere.The agency has career fraud advice.Here, a US bank spokesperson sent out a statement encouraging people to watch this video as they consider sending digital payments.US bank spokesman Ivan Lapiska said: “Scammers may also try to deceive an individual into making the transaction themselves as part of than a scam.” “The best protection against scams is to stay alert to the red flags detailed in educational materials, contact your financial institution immediately if you suspect something might be wrong, and do not send payments to individuals you don’t know or trust,” she noted. A spokeswoman for Zelle brought Owens’ case to the US Bank for further research.She encouraged people to visit the Zelle resource page for more information.

A recent college graduate has a warning to others after she thought she got a new job. She was deceived instead.

Miranda Owens said this happened when she was interviewing for a job at the end of last month.

Now, she owes about $5,000 to her bank because the check she deposited from a potential employer turned out to be fraudulent.

“I’m not going to lie, it’s really hard,” she said. “Because I didn’t have a lot of money in my bank account when it all started, I was really dependent on this new job.”

Owens moved from France to pursue his education at Coty College in Nevada, Missouri. Graduated in 2020 with a degree in Psychology. Since she doesn’t own a car, she started applying for remote jobs.

She eventually fell into a scam that offered her a remote job with a scammer pretending to be a reputable company.

“I looked at the Better Business Bureau,” she said. “It’s legit.” “I searched for people on the site actually, they’re actually legit on LinkedIn.”

Once Owens thought she got the job, her fake potential employer sent her a check to deposit in her bank to purchase office supplies.

When the matter was cleared up, the scammer told her to send money through Zelle to purchase office supplies from a supply company that she later discovered to be counterfeit.

Owens said that deal was blocked.

So, the scammer, posing as her employer, ordered her to send $4,500 worth of bitcoin from a machine in a convenience store in Kansas City, Kansas, to the office supply company, which turned out to be a scam.

Owens told KMBC 9 Investigates that she fully believes she has a safe and secure job offer. But she wanted to share her story as a warning as she is working to recover money that has now been lost.

“We’re the generation that should have been able to handle this better. However, here I am,” she said. “I really want people like me to really fantasize.”

Owens has also started GoFundMe to help recover money to pay off her debts.

The Federal Trade Commission said that a legitimate employer will not send you a check and then ask you to send that money elsewhere. The agency has tips on job scams, here.

A spokesperson for the US bank sent out a statement encouraging people to watch this video as they consider sending digital payments.

“Scammers may also attempt to deceive an individual into conducting the transaction themselves as part of a scam,” US bank spokesman Ivan Lapiska said. “The best protection against scams is to stay alert to the red flags detailed in educational materials, contact your financial institution immediately if you suspect something might be wrong, and do not send payments to individuals you do not know or trust.”

A spokeswoman for Zelle referred Owens’ case to the US Bank for further research. She encouraged people to visit the Zelle resource page for more information.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *