Barnacles washed up on the UK coast are a rare delicacy that seafood chefs will pay £80 a kilo for.

A pedestrian has discovered a strange-looking sea creature washed up on a British beach – and it could have been worth a small fortune.

Rare barnacles are served as a deluxe treat in upscale seafood restaurants and can command prices as high as £80 a kilo.

The tiny sea creatures were found attached to the tree trunk after coming ashore in Newgall, Pembrokeshire, in recent storms.

Ruth Crofts found barnacles wrapped around the trunk on one of her walks.

Small sea creatures have been found attached to the tree trunk after coming ashore in Newgall, Pembrokeshire, in recent storms.

Small clams are served as a delicacy in Spain and Portugal.  It is prepared by cooking it in sea water and adding a bay leaf to give it a special flavour

Small clams are served as a delicacy in Spain and Portugal. It is prepared by cooking it in sea water and adding a bay leaf to give it a special flavour

‘I spotted the Strange Traveler at Newgall,’ she said, ‘after it had been swept away by heavy winds.

From the shape of its base I thought it was either a palm tree or a coconut tree.

Obviously, she’s been at sea for a long time.

“It was colonized by a group of barnacle geese and it really was a beautiful sight on the gravel bank.”

Small clams are served as a delicacy in Spain and Portugal.

It is their status as a delicacy that helps push their prices up so much.

Barnacles – like many other dishes – are eaten without many additives.

It is prepared by cooking it in sea water and adding a bay leaf to give it a special flavour.

Seafood lovers say they taste like a little bit of the sea.

They are often found attached to rocks, ships, ropes, or debris in the sea.

In appearance, they have a long, fleshy, neck-like trunk and a hard, chalky-white shell that encloses the main body with their legs.

The creatures are usually found along the coast of North America.

However, it is thought to have been found in West Wales as a result of the Gulf Stream and also very strong winds which likely swept the tree trunk with it tied to it on the beach.

Experts think Pembrokeshire oysters may have been too small for dining tables.

They also said that the barnacles had been washed too long to be edible, so they didn’t fetch high prices as a delicacy anymore.

British chef Gordon Ramsay previously featured goose barnacles on his Channel 4 series The F Word.

Experts think Pembrokeshire oysters may have been too small for dining tables

Experts think Pembrokeshire oysters may have been too small for dining tables

British chef Gordon Ramsay previously featured goose barnacles on his Channel 4 series The F Word

British chef Gordon Ramsay previously featured goose barnacles on his Channel 4 series The F Word

He also recommends cooking them in salt water with a bay leaf.  In addition, it is suggested to add some olive oil to the cooking water and cook the delicacy for only 1 minute -

He also recommends cooking them in salt water with a bay leaf. Plus, he suggests adding some olive oil to the cooking water and cooking the delicacy for just a minute—”as long as it takes the Lord’s Prayer,” he added.

During the third season, he finds out firsthand how dangerous the barnacle harvest can be.

He also recommends cooking them in salt water with a bay leaf.

Plus, he suggests adding some olive oil to the cooking water and cooking the delicacy for just a minute—”as long as the Lord’s Prayer takes.”

Chef Ramsay shared his secret to getting barnacles out of their shell: peeling them while they’re warm.

To serve them, cook cherry sauce with charlottes, bay leaves, fresh peppercorns, a touch of cherry wine, 2 tablespoons of cream, some lemon zest, the juice of 1 lemon, and 2 tablespoons of the cooking water. of barnacles.

He sautéed the barnacles with some fresh parsley in the panto sauce for a minute, but he cautioned getting them out quickly because cooking them in the hot skillet no longer causes them to taste like a ‘piece of rubber band’.

Why are barnacles so expensive?

Goose barnacles are expensive due to the difficulty in collecting them.

In addition to being found on shipwrecks, it grows on rocks on coasts, which can be dangerous to attempt to harvest.

Goose hunters risk injury and death to harvest the delicacy.

They jump from their boats onto the steep rocks, where the wind is strongest and the tide is highest.

The more serious the stain, the better the barnacles—and the more expensive they are.

Limited supply due to harsh harvesting conditions add to their value, particularly in Spain and Portugal where they are a delicacy.

Goose hunters risk injury and death to harvest the delicacy

Goose hunters risk injury and death to harvest the delicacy

Gordon Ramsay himself discovered how dangerous harvesting can be among the sharp rocks

Gordon Ramsay himself discovered how dangerous harvesting can be among the sharp rocks

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