Hatred of green vegetables begins in the womb! Children smile at carrots but frown at turnips

Hatred of green vegetables begins in the womb! 4D ultrasound reveals babies smile when mom eats carrots – but frown when she picks turnip

  • The researchers performed radiological examinations on 100 pregnant women at 32 and 36 weeks of the week
  • The women had a capsule of carrots or cabbage 20 minutes before the examination
  • The results showed that the children smiled after the carrot, but frowned after the turnip
  • The results suggest that what pregnant women eat may influence children’s tastes

While the idea of ​​a salad will make some taste buds numb, for others, the idea of ​​chomping on a bowl of veggies feels more like punishment.

Now, a study has shown that babies start responding to different flavors while they are in the womb.

Researchers from Durham University conducted 4D ultrasound scans of 100 pregnant women to see how their unborn babies responded after being exposed to flavors from the foods their mothers ate.

The results showed how the fetuses smiled shortly after their mothers ate the carrots – but were stunned when their mothers picked the turnip.

The findings suggest that what pregnant women eat may influence their children’s taste preferences after birth.

If this is the case, the findings may have implications for establishing healthy eating habits.

smiling baby face

Researchers from Durham University conducted 4D ultrasound scans of 100 pregnant women to see how their unborn babies responded after being exposed to flavors from the foods their mothers ate. Left: neutral child’s face, smiling child’s face right

When women eat carrots, fetuses tend to smile on scan (arrow image)

When women eat carrots, fetuses tend to smile on scan (arrow image)

Are you an expert?

To see if you’re a super star:

1. Darken your mouth by spinning around the red wine

2. Take a piece of notepad paper with holes in the margin, which is about 6mm in diameter

3. Put a hole over your tongue and count the number of papillae – tiny fleshy bumps – that pop out

4. If you have less than 15, you are not an expert, if you have 15-30 papillae, you are a connoisseur and anything over 30 means you are an expert

Put a hole in your tongue and count the number of papillae - tiny fleshy bumps - that pop out

Put a hole in your tongue and count the number of papillae – tiny fleshy bumps – that pop out

Previous studies indicated that babies can taste and smell in the womb by inhaling and swallowing amniotic fluid.

However, these studies have been based on postnatal outcomes.

Instead, the researchers tested whether babies could taste in the womb by evaluating their reactions to flavors before birth.

The team recruited 100 pregnant women between the ages of 18 and 40 and performed 4D ultrasound examinations at 32 weeks and 36 weeks.

The women were given one capsule 20 minutes before each examination containing either 400 mg of carrot from 400 mg of cabbage powder and asked not to consume any other foods or flavored drinks that could affect the children’s reactions.

Meanwhile, some women in the control group had none of the capsule.

The results showed that only a small amount of carrot or cabbage flavor was enough to stimulate the embryos’ reaction.

When the women ate the carrots, the fetuses tended to smile on examination — but when they ate the turnip capsule, the fetuses tended to frown.

“It was really amazing to see the unborn babies react to the flavors of kale or carrots during screening and to share those moments with their parents,” said lead author Besa Auston.

The results suggest that a range of chemical stimuli pass through the mother’s diet to the fetus’s environment, according to Professor Benoist Schall of the University of Burgundy, co-author of the study.

neutral baby

peeled baby

The results showed that only a small amount of carrot or cabbage flavor was enough to stimulate the embryos’ reaction. Left: Neutral baby, Right: Peeled baby

When the women ate the turnip capsule, the fetuses tended to frown (stored image)

When the women ate the turnip capsule, the fetuses tended to frown (stored image)

“This may have important implications for our understanding of the development of our taste and olfactory receptors, and related cognition and memory,” he said.

The findings suggest that what pregnant women eat may influence their children’s taste preferences after birth.

“As a result, we believe that this frequent exposure to flavors before birth can help determine postpartum food preferences, which may be important when considering messages about healthy eating and the possibility of avoiding ‘discomfort with food’ when weaning,” Miss Ustun added.

The team has now begun a follow-up study with the same babies after birth, to see if their reactions to food in the womb are the same now.

Professor Jackie Plesset of Aston University, co-author of the study, concluded: “It can be argued that repeated exposure to flavors before birth may lead to preferences for those flavors tested after birth.

In other words, exposing the fetus to less “liked” flavors, such as kale, may mean that it is getting used to those flavors in the womb.

“The next step is to examine whether fetuses show fewer ‘negative’ responses to these flavors over time, which leads to greater acceptance of those flavors when babies first taste them outside the womb.

The Microbiome: Does It Control Everything?

Researchers now estimate that the typical human body is made up of about 30 trillion human cells and 39 trillion bacteria.

These elements are essential in getting energy from our food, regulating our immune function, and keeping the intestinal lining healthy.

The interest and knowledge of microbes has recently spread because we now realize how important they are to our health.

A healthy, balanced microbiome helps us break down foods, protect us from infection, train our immune system, and make vitamins, such as K and B12.

It also sends signals to our brain that can affect mood, anxiety and appetite.

Imbalances in the gut are increasingly being linked to a range of conditions. Last year, scientists at the California Institute of Technology found the first-ever link between the gut and Parkinson’s symptoms.

The composition of our gut microbiota is determined in part by our genes, but can also be influenced by lifestyle factors such as our diet, alcohol intake, and exercise, as well as medications.

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