Meta will free the nipple: Facebook and Instagram lift bans on bare breasts

Meta is working to “liberate the nipple” based on its oversight board’s recommendation that the ban on bare breasts violates the “human rights” of women, transgender people, and non-binary people.

The board’s recommendation centered on Instagram banning two posts by a couple, one transgender and the other non-binary, who were topless but covered their nipples to raise awareness about top surgery.

The board said that [old] The policy is based on a binary view of gender and the distinction between male and female bodies, making rules about nipple stripping “blurred” for those who don’t identify as women.

But it also affects women, who have long campaigned for the removal of images of bare breasts while arguing that men are allowed to share their bare breasts.

Nude protesters – men and women – marched to Facebook headquarters in New York in 2020 to demand a change to the nude breast policy.

Meta will allow nude breasts on Facebook and Instagram after its oversight board said the ban ‘has hindered the expression of women, transgender and non-binary people on its platforms’

The board, which is funded by Meta but operates independently, said in a ruling that the company’s policy on adult nudity is based on a gender binary perspective, making it unclear how the rules apply to intersex, non-binary and transgender people.

Facebook and Instagram were criticized in 2013 for removing images of breastfeeding women, but the platforms apologized for the ‘mistake’ and said they encouraged such images on their platforms.

Of the two posts that raised the issue, one from 2021 and one from 2022, she said: ‘The Oversight Board has found that the removal of these posts is inconsistent with Meta community standards, values ​​or human rights responsibilities.

These cases also highlight fundamental issues with Meta policies.

The board's recommendation centered on Instagram banning two posts by a couple, one transgender and the other non-binary, who were topless but covered their nipples to raise awareness about top surgery.  Pictured is another person who underwent surgery on the top

The board’s recommendation centered on Instagram banning two posts by a couple, one transgender and the other non-binary, who were topless but covered their nipples to raise awareness about top surgery. Pictured is another person who underwent surgery on the top

“Such an approach makes it unclear how the rules apply to intersex, non-binary, and transgender people and requires reviewers to conduct rapid, self-assessments of sex and gender,” the board said.

While Meta originally had 60 days to respond to the board’s recommendation, it has moved forward to lift the ban, as first reported by The New York Post.

However, the new policy of allowing nude breasts was a long time in the making.

In 2000, women took to the streets in the “Free the Nipple” movement to remove images of naked breasts.

This occurred when images of breastfeeding women were banned or flagged as nudity.

The movement gained momentum in 2013 after Facebook removed clips from actress/director Lina Esco’s documentary, Free the Nipple, which sparked protests outside Facebook headquarters.

And many women argue that while hate speech is not being censored, their nipples are flagged as “dangerous”.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg tried to justify this in 2018, saying, “It’s easier to build an AI system for nipple detection than what hate speech is.”

Meta has recently been criticized for banning professional nude photography by activists who say the photos are artistic.

In 2020, protesters invaded Facebook headquarters in New York City — all naked and holding up photos of enlarged nipples.

In 2020, protesters invaded Facebook headquarters in New York City — all naked and holding up photos of enlarged nipples.

In 2020, protesters invaded Facebook headquarters in New York City — all naked and holding up photos of enlarged nipples.

The movement included the National Coalition Against Censorship’s #WeTheNipple campaign and the women’s rights group Grab Them By The Ballot.

At this time, Facebook only permitted nudity in the depiction of paintings and sculptures.

To overcome such a barrier during a 2020 demonstration, Tonic, who is known for creating similar nude art installations in iconic locations around the world, covered their nipples with images of men’s nipples, which were ‘donated’. for this specific purpose.

These same images of men’s nipples were blown out and used to cover male and female genitalia during the demonstration outside the Astor Place Cube, better known as the Alamo.

Artists Andres Serrano and Paul Mbagi Sibuya, Bravo’s Andy Cohen, Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Chad Smith, and Tonic himself all donated pictures of their nipples for the label.

However, Wednesday’s announcement could mean that artists can now freely share their work on Facebook.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *