“Rebuilding” cities by creating natural corridors can protect humanity from climate change

A new report suggests that “rebuilding” cities by creating natural corridors and wilderness spaces can protect humanity from the worst effects of climate change.

The study by the international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) claims that restoring biodiversity can boost wildlife and insulate city dwellers from heat waves, bushfires and floods.

Reconstruction is a method of restoring the nature and biodiversity of an area by allowing nature to take care of itself, reviving natural processes.

This could include managing less and wilderness areas in parks, cemeteries, and along railroads, and allowing nature to dominate former industrial sites.

Rivers can be taken out of the streams in which they are buried or allowed to become lined with vegetation while the barriers that stop the movements of fish can be removed.

Residents can do their bit, by leaving part of their private gardens in the wild and avoiding artificial lawns and pesticides.

Reconstruction is a method of restoring the nature and biodiversity of an area by allowing nature to take care of itself, reviving natural processes. Foxes are already a common sight in our cities

The study claims that restoring biodiversity can boost wildlife and insulate city dwellers from heat waves, wildfires and floods

The study claims that restoring biodiversity can boost wildlife and insulate city dwellers from heat waves, wildfires and floods

Giving nature the freedom to control all of our cities can help boost urban wildlife by creating habitats.  Pictured: the sleeping dormouse

Giving nature the freedom to control all of our cities can help boost urban wildlife by creating habitats. Pictured: the sleeping dormouse

Farmers warn that the government’s plan to rebuild housing units will lead to a “significant increase” in food prices

A British House of Commons committee warned in January that Britons could face a “significant increase” in food prices and shortages due to an overhaul of payments to farmers.

The government’s plans to reward farmers for protecting the environment are based on “blind optimism” and could make the country completely dependent on imports.

The National Agricultural Union also has growing concerns about Britain’s food security, warning that changing farmland use would harm the UK’s self-sufficiency and lead to increased imports.

Read more

“Wildfires, floods and heat waves around the world have highlighted the climate crisis for many people this year,” said Dr. Natalie Pettorelli, lead author and climate and biodiversity expert at ZSL’s ZSL Institute of Zoology.

“The nexus between climate crisis and nature loss is now widely recognized and resettlement is an approach that is increasingly being embraced.”

Habitat creation and urban wildlife are critical in the fight against climate change, as they help protect, enhance and restore habitats.

This year, Eurasian beavers were reintroduced in a wooded area of ​​Enfield, north London, after being absent for 400 years.

Fur additions are set to help restore natural habitats and even reduce flood risks in the city.

While foxes are a common site in our cities, other animals have appeared unexpectedly.

Two seahorses and hundreds of seals now call the Thames their home.

In 2019, the Zoological Society of London counted 932 harbor seals and 3,243 gray seals in the water.

And the bison has just been reintroduced to the forests in Kent, where they have been absent for 6000 years.

Giving nature the freedom to control all parts of our cities can not only help protect them from extreme weather events such as storms, floods and heat waves, by helping to calm them and create natural flood defenses, but also help boost urban wildlife by creating Habitats, Dr. Pettorelli said.

Two seahorses and hundreds of seals now call the Thames their home.  Pictured: a seahorse in the Thames being measured by ZSL's conservation team

Two seahorses and hundreds of seals now call the Thames their home. Pictured: a seahorse in the Thames being measured by ZSL’s conservation team

In 2019, the Zoological Society of London counted 932 harbor seals and 3,243 gray seals in the water.

In 2019, the Zoological Society of London counted 932 harbor seals and 3,243 gray seals in the water.

Findings of the “Climate Change” report

A new report from The Wildlife Trusts predicts that by 2050 and under a future warming trajectory of up to 5.4°F (3°C) warming by 2100:

  • 94 per submission of the 2,700 Trusts sites are expected to see maximum summer temperature increases of more than 1.8°F (1°C) compared to 1981-2010; With 7 percent of those exceeding +2.7°F (+1.5°C), all are in southern England.
  • 55 percent will see a decrease in nearby river flows of more than 30 percent during times of low flow compared to 1981-2010.
  • 50 percent will experience 30 or more days of very high wildfire risk annually compared to just 9 percent between 1981-2010.

It has also been noted that relocation improves mental health, as it gives people a chance to interact with nature.

“Spending time in nature has been found to help with mental health issues such as anxiety and depression,” said the charity Mind.

The study reveals that by 2050, two out of three people are likely to live in cities or other urban environments, meaning that incorporating rebuilding now could have a significant impact on thousands of people.

The concept has already been successful in Germany and Singapore, where they have seen a huge positive impact from the repacking.

In Singapore, the famous Bay Gardens boasts 18 miraculous trees, some reaching 160 feet, that mimic ordinary trees by absorbing heat, filtering rainwater and providing shade.

It is also now home to around 158,000 living plants, allowing nature to take back control.

“Reconstruction of urban spaces on a large scale, including the creation of natural corridors and wilderness spaces around city infrastructure, has so far been relatively overlooked as part of the solution,” said Dr. Pettorelli.

“This is the first report of its kind that lays out a roadmap for rebuilding our cities and we believe this is a high-impact solution to address the crises of biodiversity loss and climate at low cost.”

It has also been noted that relocation improves mental health, as it gives people a chance to interact with nature.  Pictured: checkered lord butterfly

It has also been noted that relocation improves mental health, as it gives people a chance to interact with nature. Pictured: checkered lord butterfly

The concept has already been successful in Germany and Singapore, where they have seen a huge positive impact from the repacking.  Pictured: El Shaheen El Hadary

The concept has already been successful in Germany and Singapore, where they have seen a huge positive impact from the repacking. Pictured: El Shaheen El Hadary

However, while rebuilding has been shown to benefit the environment and the individuals who live in it, the scientists behind the report cautioned that urban rebuilding must be delivered through professional advice and support.

Large-scale resettlement should take place under the guidance of experts because well-intentioned but misguided efforts can actually lead to further loss of biodiversity and increased threats to public health through invasive species, transmission of diseases from wildlife as well as exacerbating social inequalities, said Dr. Pettorelli. .

With the reintroduction of new species, disease risk assessments must be made to ensure that the animal is safe in its new habitat and that its new home is safe from the animal.

Dr Pettorelli added: “For the reconstruction of urban spaces to be successful, we need the support and support of policy makers, financiers, conservation scientists, and of course local communities.

There is a lot that the average person can do to support positive change. For example, by leaving part of your garden in the wild, and avoiding artificial turf and pesticides, we can all do our part to secure a future where wildlife and people thrive.

How do ledges make landscapes more resilient to climate change?

Beavers build dams that create a series of ponds connected to waterways.

The resulting wetlands help strengthen environments against climate change in several ways;

  • Provide water for wildlife This includes drinking water for large mammals, insect habitats and allowing plants to grow.
  • Earth cooling Deep waters are the coldest, so their pools help lower the water temperature. When this cold water spills into the environment, it cools the Earth.
  • air cooling Ponds have a large area that allows for faster evaporation of water, which works like air conditioners.
  • flood prevention In addition to physically holding on to rainwater, a pond net helps slow the flow of water during periods of heavy rain, allowing the ground to absorb more of it.
  • Maintaining wetlands during droughts Deep water areas created by dams help prevent drying out of wetland areas.

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