Russia says private satellites can become a “legitimate target” during the war in space provocations

Russia has said that private satellites used by the United States and its allies could become legitimate military targets amid the ongoing war in Ukraine.

The remarks – made this week by Konstantin Vorontsov, a member of the Russian Foreign Ministry and head of the country’s delegation to the United Nations – came during a meeting of a working group in Geneva on reducing threats and increasing cooperation in space.

Vorontsov stated that the Russian delegation “would like to emphasize a very dangerous trend that goes beyond the harmless use of outer space technologies and has become evident during the events in Ukraine.”

According to the UN’s English translation of the statement, Vorontsov said the use of commercial and civilian satellite assets by the US and its allies during the ongoing invasion of Ukraine “constitutes indirect involvement in military conflicts” whether they realize it or not and that. So-called “semi-civilian infrastructure may become a legitimate target for retaliation.”

Russia has said that private satellites used by the United States and its allies could become legitimate military targets amid the ongoing war in Ukraine. Above: Starlink satellites in space

Shortly after its February invasion, SpaceX (founded by Elon Musk above) sent multiple shipments of Starlink terminals to Ukraine to boost coverage and connectivity after Russia's attacks on the country's infrastructure

Shortly after its February invasion, SpaceX (founded by Elon Musk above) sent multiple shipments of Starlink terminals to Ukraine to boost coverage and connectivity after Russia’s attacks on the country’s infrastructure

US officials have said Elon Musk's Starlink satellite system is giving Ukrainian forces an edge in the drone war as the country harnesses technology to track down Russian invaders — even in Ukraine's infamous hinterland.  Above: A man runs in front of a burning house after it was bombed in the city of Irbin, outside Kyiv, on March 4, 2022

US officials have said Elon Musk’s Starlink satellite system is giving Ukrainian forces an edge in the drone war as the country harnesses technology to track down Russian invaders — even in Ukraine’s infamous hinterland. Above: A man runs in front of a burning house after it was bombed in the city of Irbin, outside Kyiv, on March 4, 2022

“At the very least, this provocative use of civilian satellites is questionable under the Outer Space Treaty, which provides for the peaceful use of outer space, and must be strongly condemned by the international community,” the statement continues.

Russia’s comments arrive at a time when Ukraine’s military is in retreat and tensions between the United States and Vladimir Putin’s regime are rising.

US officials have said Elon Musk’s Starlink satellite system is giving Ukrainian forces an edge in the drone war as the country harnesses technology to track down Russian invaders — even in Ukraine’s infamous hinterland.

In addition to the military applications of the Starlink network, Ukrainians also use it to bring high-speed communications to IDP camps in the country’s western villages where many of them have fled.

Starlink stations, small and attached to a dish-style antenna (above), require very little electricity to operate and can even be powered by a car's cigarette lighter, making them easy to operate in the war-torn country.

Starlink stations, small and attached to a dish-style antenna (above), require very little electricity to operate and can even be powered by a car’s cigarette lighter, making them easy to operate in the war-torn country.

Thanks to Starlink, members of Ukraine's 93rd Mechanized Brigade can tell loved ones they are safe through encrypted satellite messages daily after the local cell phone network was cut off during heavy bombing, according to Politico.

Thanks to Starlink, members of Ukraine’s 93rd Mechanized Brigade can tell loved ones they are safe through encrypted satellite messages daily after the local cell phone network was cut off during heavy bombing, according to Politico.

The Pentagon revealed that Starlink faced a Russian jamming attack in April, and indicated that the US military response to the attack would have taken much longer.

The Pentagon revealed that Starlink faced a Russian jamming attack in April, and indicated that the US military response to the attack would have taken much longer.

Politico reports that members of Ukraine’s 93rd Mechanized Brigade are able to tell loved ones they are safe through daily encrypted satellite messages after the local mobile phone network was cut off during heavy bombing.

‘Thank you, Elon Musk,’ Oleksi told Politico shortly after logging in via satellite to discover that the Biden administration would be sending long-range missiles to the Ukrainian military in its fight with the Russians.

Shortly after its February invasion, SpaceX sent multiple shipments from Starlink stations to Ukraine to boost coverage and connectivity after Russia’s attacks on the country’s infrastructure.

There were soon 150,000 daily active Starlink users in the country and a total of 15,000 stations were in use.

The Pentagon revealed that Starlink “quickly” responded to a Russian jamming attack in April, and indicated that the US military response to the attack would have taken much longer.

Dave Tremper, of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, praised SpaceX for its agility, particularly “for the way Starlink has been able to upgrade when a threat arises.”

Starlink stations, small and attached to a dish-style antenna, require very little electricity to operate and can even be powered by a car’s cigarette lighter, making them easy to operate in the war-torn country.

The U.S. Air Force awarded SpaceX a $1.9 million contract for Starlink services in Europe and Asia which noted that the system is “the only low-Earth orbit satellite network provider currently in use in a contested environment: Ukraine,” Politico first reported.

The statement of the Russian delegation reportedly went on to warn the United Nations against adopting “fragmentary and non-exhaustive rules for regulating space activities, which do not take into account the approach of all UN member states and seek to ensure space dominance for a small group.” Countries.

Russia then said that US member states should “focus on fulfilling national and international obligations not to place weapons of any kind in outer space (including in Earth orbit and on celestial bodies) and prohibiting the threat or use of force against or with objects space, as well as a complete and comprehensive ban on strike weapons in outer space for use against space objects.

However, the communist country seemed keen to cut ties with the United States and its allies on other matters relating to space – last month it revealed a model of what its planned space station will look like once it leaves the International Space Station.

Roscosmos displayed a model of the planned space station – which will contain four modules during its first phase and eventually expand to six with a service platform – at a military-industrial exhibition outside Moscow.

Yoris Borisov, head of the Russian Space Agency, said that Russia will leave the International Space Station after 2024 and that it is working on its own space station.

Russian state media suggested launching the first stage in 2025-25 and no later than 2030, with the final stage planned for 2030-35.

The US Air Force awarded a $1.9 million contract to SpaceX for Starlink services in Europe and Asia which indicated that the system is

The U.S. Air Force has awarded a $1.9 million contract to SpaceX for Starlink services in Europe and Asia that noted the system is “the only provider of the network of low-orbital satellites currently in use in a contested environment: Ukraine,” Politico reported. Above: Ukraine’s Volodymyr Zelensky is seen talking with SpaceX founder Elon Musk

Roscosmos demonstrated a model of its new space station (above) - which will contain four modules during its first phase and eventually expand to six with a service platform - at a military-industrial exhibition outside Moscow

Roscosmos demonstrated a model of its new space station (above) – which will contain four modules during its first phase and eventually expand to six with a service platform – at a military-industrial exhibition outside Moscow

ELON MUSK SPACEX transmits broadband internet to the world through its STARLINK family of satellites

Elon Musk’s SpaceX has launched more than 3,000 of its Starlink space internet satellites into orbit and hopes to have 30,000 in the sky.

It forms a constellation designed to provide low-cost broadband Internet service from low Earth orbit.

While satellite internet has been around for a while, it has suffered from high latency and unreliable connections.

Starlink is different. SpaceX said its goal is to provide high-speed, low-latency internet around the world — especially for remote areas.

Musk previously said the project could give the three billion people who currently don’t have access to the Internet a cheap way to get online.

It will also help fund a future city on Mars.

Helping humanity reach the Red Planet and become multi-planetary is one of Musk’s long-standing goals and what inspired him to start SpaceX.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, Musk’s rival, also plans to launch a constellation of low-Earth orbit satellites to provide broadband access to remote areas, as part of Project Kuiper.

However, astronomers have raised concerns about light pollution and other interference caused by these satellite constellations.

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