Student builds a platform to help the world stay informed about the Ukraine war

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Bernard Mordler points to his computer screen when an air raid warning pops up.

“Luhansk is under fire now,” Mordler said.

The 21-year-old student and programmer has developed a platform called Ukrainian Siren Alarm to keep the world informed as the Russian invasion continues.

The warning system not only warns of incoming missiles, but also provides real-time data on missiles, minefields and other threats that may affect civilians caught in the middle of war. Most of the information is collected from government, military, and open source information.

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“It’s like an octopus with its tentacles scattered all over the place and it collects all the data in one place, so that users can find it somewhere easy to see,” said Mordler.

Student and programmer Bernard Mordler, 21, says the idea for the platform came to him after his girlfriend’s family members were trapped in Ukraine at the start of the war.
(Fox News)

The idea for the humanitarian project came about when Russia started the war with Ukraine in late February. Moerdler’s girlfriend had family members trapped in the country, desperately searching for ways to stay up to date with the conflict as it raged.

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That was when Mordler knew he had to do something to help.

“I really came to understand that the systems out there weren’t quite enough and that I could try to make something better. And that’s how I came to create the system itself,” Mordler recalls.

A makeshift church in the Nuns' Bomb Shelter prepares for shelter when air strikes go off, at the Hochev Women's Convent, where nuns were taking in internally displaced people fleeing war, in Ivano-Frankivsk region, western Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Mattresses, blankets and benches are also on the floor Lower.  But even in the absence of a siren, children happily use the underground cavernous space.

A makeshift church in the Nuns’ Bomb Shelter prepares for shelter when air strikes go off, at the Hochev Women’s Convent, where nuns were taking in internally displaced people fleeing war, in Ivano-Frankivsk region, western Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Mattresses, blankets and benches are also on the floor Lower. But even in the absence of a siren, children happily use the underground cavernous space.
(Photo by Associated Press/Nariman Al-Mufti)

Sirens Ukraine has thousands of users daily who also rely on the software to find shelters and Wi-Fi accessible locations on their journey to safer places. On the website, UASA.io, more than 42,000 shelters have already been planned.

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Through the site, Ukrainians can sign up for SMS and email alerts, so they are prepared for an incoming fire. Like the Israeli Red Alert System, which was part of Moerdler’s inspiration, messages can save lives in an emergency.

Student and programmer Bernard Mordler, 21, says the idea for the platform came to him after his girlfriend’s family members were trapped in Ukraine at the start of the war.

With the increase in Russian attacks, the price of alerting Ukrainians via SMS messages is rising. Moerdler launched a GoFundMe to help support the project.

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“I hope we are around the corner for peace and for the conflict to end.” Mordler said. “But until then, I will keep moving forward, keep innovating, and try to help as many people as possible.”

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