Study finds that using eggplant emoji makes you look less likeable

They say a picture says a thousand words, which may be why 92 percent of internet users use emojis every day.

But when flirting with text, there is one symbol you may want to stay away from – the infamous Aubergine symbol.

According to Adobe’s US Emoji Trend Report, sending suggestive veggies can make you appear less likable to the recipient.

But it’s not the biggest reason for the failure of digital courtship, as the Pile of Poo emoji was voted the number one most likely to end a potential romance by the study’s 5,000 participants.

On the other hand, the Blowing a Kiss Face emoji was considered the most liked when it comes to flirting or dating, with Smiling Face with Hearts and Smiling Face with Heart-Eyes taking the second and third places.

This may be key information for dating app users, as the study found that 72 percent of users would send an emoji in a conversation with someone they’re interested in.

According to Adobe’s US Emoji Trend Report, sending an eggplant-suggestive emoji can make you look less like the recipient.

On the other hand, the Blowing a Kiss Face emoji (pictured) has been much loved when it comes to flirting or dating, with Smiling Face with Hearts and Smiling Face with Heart-Eyes taking second and third places

On the other hand, the Blowing a Kiss Face emoji (pictured) has been much loved when it comes to flirting or dating, with Smiling Face with Hearts and Smiling Face with Heart-Eyes taking second and third places

Best make or break emoji icons for romance or dating

Emojis that make you look more lovable when flirting:

1. inflatable kiss face

2. Smiling face with hearts

3. Heart eyes face

Emojis that make you look less desirable when flirting:

1. A pile of stool

2. angry face

3. Eggplant / Eggplant

The survey also revealed significant differences in how men and women use emojis, with 76 percent of male respondents saying they used them more while flirting, compared to just 68 percent of women.

Using emojis is a sign of emotional intelligence, said Paul D. Hunt, font designer and font developer at Adobe. It shows that you are capable of being vulnerable and wearing your heart on your sleeve.

You wouldn’t want to be in a relationship with someone who couldn’t share their feelings with you, would you?

I think the same goes for digital communications.

The use of emojis and the ability to communicate emotionally digitally is part of the expected package for emotional maturity.

If you are not able to do this, it may leave a potential partner wondering if you lack these skills in real life as well.

While emojis were invented in 1999, it wasn’t until they were widely introduced as part of smartphone keyboards in 2011.

“Emojis give people the resources they need to express themselves and show their feelings, whether it’s on social media or messaging apps,” said Camili Demir, computer scientist and Adobe representative on the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee.

It allows people to convey more than just words on screen and connect more deeply with others.

Adobe has released its annual Emoji Trend Report since 2019, which is the results of a survey of thousands of Americans about their use of emojis.

This year they focused on how small photos help users express themselves, with 73 percent reporting that they make you look cooler, friendlier and more fun.

Adobe also revealed that 88 percent reported feeling more sympathy for someone using an emoji, and 75 percent feeling more connected to them.

The four most used emojis in the US are positive;  Face with tears of joy, thumb, red heart, rolling on the ground laughing

The four most used emojis in the US are positive; Face with tears of joy, thumb, red heart, rolling on the ground laughing

While emojis can certainly help a person convey the tone of a message, a specific message can have the opposite effect.

The cowboy hat face, cherry, and inverted face were voted as the three most commonly misunderstood in the Adobe study.

This may not be due to their determination, with 50 percent of respondents claiming to intentionally use emojis differently from their intended meaning.

Generation Z – those born between 1997 and 2012 – are the most likely to do so, with 74 percent reporting that they use a particular emoji to convey a different meaning.

The same only applies to 65 percent of Millennials, 48 ​​percent of Generation X and 24 percent of Baby Boomers, showing that demographics play a huge role in how emojis are used.

The vast majority of those studied, 91 percent, claimed that they used emojis to bring up conversations, making them appear less serious.

This somehow explains why the four most used emojis are positive; Face with tears of joy, thumb, red heart, rolling on the floor laughing.

Its popularity also stems from inclusivity, with 92 percent of emoji users agreeing that they helped communicate across language barriers.

In 2015, the Unicode Consortium expanded the skin tones available for emojis featuring humans and body parts, and this year also added a pregnant man.

According to Emojipedia, an emoji reference site, this symbol is a recognition that “pregnancy is possible for some transgender men and non-binary people.”

Despite these additions, two in five users still report that their identities are not reflected in their current emoji offerings, and 83 percent agree that they should still provide more representation.

Emojis are an important tool in opening conversations about cultural and societal issues, with 75 percent believing they can help raise awareness for diverse groups of people.

Moose, shaking face and pink heart are among the new emojis coming to your phone in the Unicode 15.0 update.

Emoji lovers rejoice – pink heart is finally added to your smartphone keyboard!

This is one of 31 new emoji that have just been adopted by The Unicode Consortium, the body for standardizing characters in the world’s writing systems.

The new Emoji 15.0 set also includes a shake face (I shook), a banana, a stalk ginger, a Wi-Fi icon and a pair of maracas.

There are also new Hand Push Right and Hand Push Left emojis, each available in five different skin tones.

Unfortunately, you won’t be able to publish it in your group chats yet, as Apple, Google, and Meta owned platforms first have to implement it in their software.

Google and Android platforms are likely to release support for the new emoji between October and December, while iPhone and Samsung users may have to wait until next year.

Read more here

New Emoji 15.0 set includes a shaking face, a banana, a ginger stem, a Wi-Fi icon and a pair of maracas

New Emoji 15.0 set includes a shaking face, a banana, a ginger stem, a Wi-Fi icon and a pair of maracas

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