Tomorrow the Earth’s population will reach eight billion

The United Nations says Earth’s population will reach eight billion tomorrow in a ‘major milestone for humanity’

  • The United Nations estimated that the world’s population will reach eight billion tomorrow
  • It took 12 years for the world’s population to grow from 7 to 8 billion people
  • The report says it will now take about 15 years – until 2037 – for it to reach 9 billion.
  • The world population is currently increasing at its slowest rate since 1950

The United Nations has estimated that the world’s population will reach eight billion tomorrow.

The United Nations said we should marvel at the improvements in health care that make such a feat possible.

Next year, India’s population will surpass that of China, as India will match and begin to overtake the Chinese population of 1.4 billion, the United Nations said in its World Population Prospects report.

It took 12 years for the world’s population to grow from 7 to 8 billion.

It will now take nearly 15 years – until 2037 – for it to reach 9 billion, the report said, which indicates that the overall growth rate of the world’s population is slowing.

The United Nations has estimated that the world’s population will reach eight billion tomorrow. This graph shows how population figures have changed in some countries over the past decade

The World Population Day study revealed that the slowing pace of death rate means that the world population will reach eight billion tomorrow, 8.5 billion by 2030 and 10.4 billion by 2100 (pictured, the world's population growth over the years)

The World Population Day study revealed that the slowing pace of death rate means that the world population will reach eight billion tomorrow, 8.5 billion by 2030 and 10.4 billion by 2100 (pictured, the world’s population growth over the years)

UN Secretary-General António Guterres said: “This year’s World Population Day marks a significant year, when we expect the birth of the eight billion inhabitants of the Earth.

This is an occasion to celebrate our diversity, acknowledge our common humanity, and admire advances in health that have extended lives and dramatically reduced maternal and child mortality rates.

“At the same time, it is a reminder of our shared responsibility to care for our planet and a moment to reflect on where we are still falling short in our obligations to each other,” he added.

The world population is now growing at its slowest rate since 1950, with the rate falling to less than 1 percent in 2020.

The United Nations’ latest projections indicate that the world’s population could grow to around 8.5 billion in 2030 and 9.7 billion in 2050.

It is expected to peak at around 10.4 billion people during the 1980s and to remain at this level until 2100.

World population projections in 2022 indicate that fertility has declined significantly in recent decades in many countries.

United Nations estimates showed that population growth was growing at its slowest pace since 1950, after falling to less than 1 percent in 2020. Pictured, Europe's population is declining

United Nations estimates showed that population growth was growing at its slowest pace since 1950, after falling to less than 1 percent in 2020. Pictured, Europe’s population is declining

Today, two-thirds of the world’s population lives in a country or region with lifetime fertility rates below 2.1 births per woman, the level required for nearly zero long-term growth for a population with low mortality.

The population of 61 countries or territories is expected to decline by 1 percent or more between 2022 and 2050, due to continued low fertility levels and, in some cases, higher rates of migration.

More than half of the expected increase in the world’s population to 2050 will be concentrated in eight countries: the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines and the United Republic of Tanzania.

Countries in sub-Saharan Africa are expected to account for more than half of the projected increase through 2050.

The UK population will currently be 68.5 million in 2022, with an average annual rate of population change of 0.4 per cent compared to 0.9 in India.

The UK population will currently be 68.5 million in 2022, with an average annual rate of population change of 0.4 per cent compared to 0.9 in India.

India’s billionth child was born in the year 2000. Aastha Arora is officially ranked as the billionth child in the country.

Asta, now 22, told the BBC that India has a population problem.

“India has to do something to control its population,” she said, adding, “It is our cultural preference for sons that got us here.”

She said that couples continue to have children until they have a son.

The child born in India in 2011 was declared the seven billionth child in the world by the children’s rights organization Plan International.

Baby Nargis was born at 07:25 local time (01:55 GMT) in Mull village in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh on October 31, 2011.

The population of the European Union is shrinking for the second year in a row

On Monday, the Union Statistics Office said that the population of the European Union shrank for the second year in a row last year, at a time when the region is witnessing more than two million deaths due to the Corona virus.

According to Eurostat, the populations of the 27 countries that make up the bloc decreased by nearly 172,000 from the previous year and more than 656,000 from January 2020.

“In 2020 and 2021, positive net migration no longer compensated for negative natural change in the EU, and as a result, the overall EU population declined,” the report said, citing the effects of the pandemic.

Deaths began to outnumber births in the European Union a decade ago, but immigration from outside the bloc helped make up the gap until the first year of the pandemic.

The European Union's statistics office said on Monday that the European Union's population shrank for a second year in a row last year

The European Union’s statistics office said on Monday that the European Union’s population shrank for a second year in a row last year

The last time the EU had a population decline was in 2011 – the only other time since 1960 – but this has rebounded quickly due to net immigration.

Eurostat said deaths should continue to outpace births in coming years given the pandemic, elderly population and relatively low fertility rates.

“If this is the case, the overall decline in the EU population or future growth is likely to depend largely on the contribution made by net migration,” the report said.

More than half of the EU member states experienced an increase in their population, led by France, followed by the Netherlands and Sweden.

Italy, Poland and Romania recorded the largest population declines in the European Union.

Eurostat counted 446.8 million people living within the European Union by January 2022.

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