Tree farms in the Kansas City area say drought and inflation will make Christmas trees more expensive this year

Christmas trees may cost a little more this holiday season. “The kids love going out and having a real Christmas tree,” said Jill Painter. “It has become a family tradition.” We started this tradition eight years ago when we first started. “I got married,” said the painter, “While they have a pretty good idea of ​​what they want, the ideas for the trees will be different this year.” “Although I have a few different opinions now,” she said. While searching for the perfect tree between a game of hide-and-seek, they’ll also check price tags. Area tree growers said that due to drought and swells, most trees will be 20% higher this year. For holiday tree buyers like Maggie Hudson’s family, they said they understand. That it might cost a little more, and the farm said it takes eight years to grow the holiday tree. They’re hoping by this time next year, their expenses like shipping and kerosene will be down. “We’ll keep our fingers crossed. Shipping has been amazing this year,” said Lynn Walther, of Christmas Tree Farm in Strawberry Hill. Strawberry Hill has been selling trees for four decades and she usually sells in the second week of December. “The response of the people who came this year, they are happy and we are happy too,” Walter said.

Christmas trees may cost a little more this holiday season.

“The kids love to go out and get a real Christmas tree,” said Jill Painter.

She said it has become a family tradition.

“We started this tradition eight years ago when we first got married,” Pinter said.

While they have a pretty good idea of ​​what they want, this year’s ideas for trees will be different.

“Although I have a few different opinions now,” she said.

While searching for the perfect tree among a game of hide-and-seek, they will also check price tags.

Tree farms in the area said that due to drought and inflation, most trees will rise by about 20% this year.

For holiday tree buyers like Maggie Hudson’s family, they said they realize it might cost a little more.

The farm said it takes eight years to grow the holiday tree. They’re hoping by this time next year, their expenses like freight and kerosene will be down.

“We’ll keep our fingers crossed. The shipping has been amazing this year,” said Lynn Walther, of Strawberry Hill Christmas Tree Farm.

The Strawberry Hill family has been selling trees for four decades and said they usually sell out by the second week of December.

“The response of the people who came this year, they are happy and we are happy too,” Walter said.

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