Two extremely rare giant sharks captured on video off the coast of San Diego by fishermen

Two extremely rare huge sharks were captured in a video off the coast of San Diego.

David Stabile was fishing with his friends Val Costescu and Andrew Chang 30 miles offshore when they saw the huge sharks.

This weekend my friends and I went fishing off the coast of San Diego and recorded a video of two of the most elusive sharks on the planet. Here are some great shots I took of Megamouth Sharks, Stabile wrote on Twitter.

In the videos, shared on Twitter and Facebook, sharks can be seen swimming slowly near the boat. One swims close to the surface while the other can be seen below, moving almost in the shadow of the other.

Two extremely rare giant sharks were captured on video by a fisherman off the coast of San Diego this week

David Stabile was fishing with his friends Val Costescu and Andrew Chang 30 miles offshore when they saw the great sharks.

David Stabile was fishing with his friends Val Costescu and Andrew Chang 30 miles offshore when they saw the great sharks.

The second great shark has been captured from Santa Catalina Island and is on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History.  Above: Children look at a stuffed specimen of a large shark at the Museum of Marine Science at Tokai University in Japan

The second great shark has been captured from Santa Catalina Island and is on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History. Above: Children look at a stuffed specimen of a large shark at the Museum of Marine Science at Tokai University in Japan

Megamouth, officially known as megachasma pelagios, is a species of deep-water shark that was discovered in 1976 and is rarely noticed by humans.

This could be a mating pair: the second video shows a male (clasp clearly visible) with a damaged left pectoral fin; Alison Shulman-Jeniger, a research assistant at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, explained that the first video is of a scarred shark that may be female (can’t be seen). “WOWZA!”

Megamouth sharks can grow up to 18 feet in length and are usually found at depths of 3,000 to 15,000 feet.

The first giant shark was captured on November 15, 1976, about 25 miles northeast of Kahuku, Hawaii, when it became entangled in the offshore anchor of a US Navy ship.

According to Schulman-Jenniger, a second giant shark was captured from Santa Catalina Island and displayed at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History.

“It’s very uncommon to see them during the day,” she said.

This could be a mating pair: the second video shows a male (clasp clearly visible) with a damaged left pectoral fin;  Alison Shulman-Jeniger, a research assistant at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, explained that the first video is of a scarred shark that may be female (can't be seen).

This could be a mating pair: the second video shows a male (clasp clearly visible) with a damaged left pectoral fin; Alison Shulman-Jeniger, a research assistant at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, explained that the first video is of a scarred shark that may be female (can’t be seen). “WOWZA!”

Most sightings tend to occur in a small area off Taiwan.

But at least three of them — along with those from this week — have previously been seen off the coast of San Diego, two in 2018 and one in 2019.

“Some are speculating that southern California may be a breeding ground for them,” Schulman-Jeniger said.

“They spend most of their time in deep waters far from shore,” Dovi Kassif, a researcher at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, told CBS8.

Megamouth sharks have also been seen in waters near the Philippines and South Africa.

“There is still a lot of unknown about them as far as they spend their time because we see them infrequently.”

“The thing about fishing is that you never know what you’re going to find. I thought I’d seen it all at this point but who would have thought I’d see two huge sharks,” Zhang told CBS8.

Megamouth sharks can grow up to 18 feet in length and are usually found at depths of 3,000 to 15,000 feet.  A giant 12-foot-high shark stares lifelessly off a South African shore where it was swept away on April 20, 2002.

Megamouth sharks can grow up to 18 feet in length and are usually found at depths of 3,000 to 15,000 feet. A giant 12-foot-high shark stares lifelessly off a South African shore where it was swept away on April 20, 2002.

Shulman Jenniger said:

“Some are speculating that southern California may be a breeding ground for them,” Schulman-Jeniger said. Above: Fishermen use a stretcher with steel rods to carry a rare 15-foot giant shark, which has been trapped in a fisherman’s net at Burias Pass in Albay and Maspat provinces, central Philippines, Jan. 28, 2015

The incident comes at the end of a summer that appears to have seen an increase in shark sightings.

Late last month, a 1,400-pound, 13-foot-long great white shark was tracked near Cape Cod.

The giant shark, named Bob, is one of many with devices that let researchers know where they are — this information is fed into platforms like the Sharktivity app or the website of Ocearch, a marine research group.

It’s been nearly 10 months since they received a site connection test from Bob when he hit the big white man on Sunday off Nantucket Island, Massachusetts.

“We met Bob last September off Nova Scotia and the last time he hit Jacksonville, Florida was in November,” the group said.

“We’re excited to hear about Bob again and hope he continues to surface and share his location with us!”

The large sea creature was first marked on Iron Bound Island, Nova Scotia, in September 2021.

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