Video showing fetus of zebrafish winning Nikon Small World In Motion 2022

A stunning video of a developing zebrafish embryo has won the 12th annual Nikon Small World In Motion competition.

It was a time-lapse video of Dr. Eduardo Zatara Captured over an eight-hour period, lateral streak cells and melanocytes migrating through the fish’s body are shown.

Use fluorescence to compare different cell functions during this developmental period in the fetus.

The green lines are the progenitor cells of the sensory organs of vertebrates, while in the orange are the melanin-forming melanocytes that move under their skin.

Dr Zatara, from CONICET in Argentina said: This recording came out very clean and required almost no post-processing. It is an amazing display of the dynamics of neural crest cell migration.

The result was a video that was rich in biological information and visually stunning. It was by far my favorite microscopy video.

Stunning video of a developing zebrafish embryo won the 12th annual Nikon Small World In Motion competition

The green lines are the progenitor cells of the sensory organs of vertebrates, while in the orange are the melanin-forming melanocytes that move under their skin.

Dr Zatara, from CONICET in Argentina said:

The green lines are the progenitor cells of the sensory organs of vertebrates, while in the orange are the melanin-forming melanocytes that move under their skin. Dr. Zatara, from CONICET in Argentina said: ‘This recording came out very clean and required almost no post-treatment. It is an amazing display of the migration dynamics of neural crest cells’

He added, “While I maintain many lines of work ranging from genomics to community ecology, my main interest lies in the interaction between ecology, evolution and development.

I am particularly interested in how developmental abilities affect evolutionary pathways and environmental outcomes.

“While I love looking at all scales of life, I always focus on the organism to understand biological systems.”

Zebrafish are widely used in scientific research as a model vertebrate, as their tissues regenerate and help develop treatments to repair tissue damage in humans.

Scans of their brains have helped show how the brain processes and stores memories, increasing our understanding of PTSD.

“This year’s winning entry not only reflects fascinating research and trends in science, but also gives the audience a glimpse into a hidden world that can only be seen through a microscope,” said Eric Flem, Director of Communications and Customer Relationship Management at Nikon Instruments.

“As visualization technologies continue to advance, we are seeing more scientifically relevant events in higher quality and more visual detail.”

The second place went to another time-lapse video of some cultured monkey cells, which was taken by Dr. Christophe Lettier from Marseille, France.  Cells were labeled to visualize the plasma membrane in orange and DNA in blue

The second place went to another time-lapse video of some cultured monkey cells, which was taken by Dr. Christophe Lettier from Marseille, France. Cells were labeled to visualize the plasma membrane in orange and DNA in blue

The third place was awarded to Dr. Ahmed Karabulut from Kansas City, Missouri, USA for his exceptional video of anemone neurons and stinging cells.  Stinging cells are used by the animal to defend against predators and capture fish or crustaceans as prey, shown in green.  Neurons, shown in purple, extend throughout the anemone's body and allow them to detect chemical changes, capture prey, and move in response to a stimulus.

The third place was awarded to Dr. Ahmed Karabulut from Kansas City, Missouri, USA for his exceptional video of anemone neurons and stinging cells. Stinging cells are used by the animal to defend against predators and capture fish or crustaceans as prey, shown in green. Neurons, shown in purple, extend throughout the anemone’s body and allow them to detect chemical changes, capture prey, and move in response to a stimulus.

Nikon’s Little World in Motion Competition

The Nikon International Small World competition was launched in 1975 to celebrate photographers using the light microscope, also known as photojournalists.

In 2011, Nikon announced that it would begin accepting films taken through a microscope as a new category.

This category, called Small World in Motion, accepts any time-lapse video or digital photography captured through a microscope.

Photographers can use any type of light microscopy techniques, including phase contrast, polarized light, fluorescence, interference contrast, dark field, confocal, deconvolution, and mixed techniques, as well as record any subject.

The second place went to another time-lapse video of some cultured monkey cells, which was taken by Dr. Christophe Lettier from Marseille, France.

Cells were labeled to visualize the plasma membrane in orange, and their DNA in blue.

To capture the video, the neuroscientist had to keep the cells alive throughout the 12-hour acquisition period.

Dr. Leterrier had to closely control the temperature and humidity, as well as how much the cells were exposed to the laser light.

The third place was awarded to Dr. Ahmed Karabulut from Kansas City, Missouri, USA for his exceptional video of anemone neurons and stinging cells.

Stinging cells are used by the animal to defend against predators and capture fish or crustaceans as prey, shown in green.

Neurons, shown in purple, extend throughout the anemone’s body and allow them to detect chemical changes, capture prey, and move in response to a stimulus.

The video, which ranked fourth, shows dying melanoma cells, taken by Dr. Dylan T. Burnett of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

He raised the pH of cell culture media to initiate the dying process, and used a differential interference fluorescence imaging technique to enhance the contrast of clear, unstained cells.

Dr. Burnett has been using high-resolution microscopy to study cells for more than 20 years, focusing on how cells grow and divide.

A team from Barcelona, ​​Spain consisting of Ignasi Vélez-Ceron, Dr. Jordi Ignés and Dr. Francesc Sagués, won fifth place for a video of a photosensitive liquid crystal layer.

Nematic means that the crystal can polarize the light that passes through it when an electric field is applied, a property used in liquid crystal displays (LCDs).

In the video, the crystal is confined to a toroidal channel, in which the liquid film flows along the wall of the electrically charged tube while the gas flows through the medium.

The video, which ranked fourth, shows dying melanoma cells, taken by Dr. Dylan T. Burnett of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

He raised the pH of cell culture media to start the dying process, and used differential interference imaging technology to enhance the contrast of clear, unstained cells.

The video, which ranked fourth, shows dying melanoma cells, taken by Dr. Dylan T. Burnett of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He raised the pH of cell culture media to start the dying process, and used differential interference imaging technology to enhance the contrast of clear, unstained cells.

A team from Barcelona, ​​Spain consisting of Ignasi Vélez-Ceron, Dr. Jordi Ignés and Dr. Francesc Sagués, won fifth place for a video of a photosensitive liquid crystal layer.

A team from Barcelona, ​​Spain consisting of Ignasi Vélez-Ceron, Dr. Jordi Ignés and Dr. Francesc Sagués, won fifth place for a video of a photosensitive liquid crystal layer.

The videos that received honorable mention included a close-up shot of a cell going through cell division, and an eight-hour time frame of a Hydra microorganism devouring a water flea and crystallizing Epsom salt.

The Nikon International Small World competition was launched in 1975 to celebrate photographers using the light microscope, also known as photojournalists.

In 2011, Nikon announced that it would begin accepting films taken through a microscope as a new category called Small World in Motion.

This category accepts any video or digital time-lapse photography captured through a microscope.

Photographers can use any type of light microscopy techniques, including phase contrast, polarized light, fluorescence, interference contrast, dark field, confocal, deconvolution, and mixed techniques, as well as record any subject.

Scientists say a better fertility treatment could be developed after a new sex hormone was found in zebrafish

Scientists have discovered a new sex hormone in zebrafish, and they say it could lead to the development of a better fertility treatment for humans.

With a single injection, Canadian researchers partially restored the sexual function of genetically modified zebrafish, enhancing the female’s ability to ovulate and lay her eggs.

Key to the process is a small protein-like molecule produced in fish that is remarkably similar to that found in other animals, including humans.

The research team has drawn a seemingly unlikely line between the popular allure of aquariums and upcoming human infertility treatments.

This is because about 70 percent of human genes are found in zebrafish, according to scientists, making them well suited as laboratory models.

Read more here

A new hormone that stimulates sexual functions in zebrafish (pictured) could lead to new treatments for human infertility

A new hormone that stimulates sexual functions in zebrafish (pictured) could lead to new treatments for human infertility

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